All posts filed under: Press

Press mentions of John Hardy, Green School, Ibuku, Bambu Indah, Kul Kul Farm and other Green family members

Hardy Architectural Digest Photos by Tim Street Porter

Architectural Digest: The Hardy home in New York

Flashback to nearly ten years ago when Architectural Digest featured our New York home in the magazine. Photos taken by dear friend, Tim Street Porter. “I really hate fake everything,” says jewelry designer John Hardy, whose airy apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side is a kind of symphony of the real. Unexpected materials—from sconces of buffalo horn to Zulu hair hats—are used here to sumptuous effect. “We’re moving from luxury to authenticity as an idea,” Hardy says. “Authentic things seem to vibrate better.” Explore the whole gallery here or read the interview and story.

Cynthia Hardy

A profile of Cynthia Hardy

A wonderful interview and profile of Cynthia Hardy in MM. Lafleur. Cynthia talks about travels, her life as a mother, and her role as co-founder of Green School and more. ON FOUNDING A HOTEL… AND A SCHOOL: We started building our house in Bali in 1995, and it was finished in 1997. Then, in the early 2000s, a piece of land just south of ours came onto the market. We didn’t need more space, but we knew that if we didn’t buy it someone else was going to build a hotel there. So we bought it and sat on it for a few years. We knew this really industrious guy from Java, and we asked him to find us some furniture and old wooden houses—traditional ones built in primitive ways, from logs, without panels. We put them up on that land and had the Neiman Marcus buyers come out and stay there. Eventually, we decided to turn it into something that paid for itself, and now it’s a little hotel called Bambu Indah that’s essentially an …

Juliet Kinsman The Times Green School Bali

Is this the world’s coolest school?

Green School in The Times in a wonderful article by Green School parent Juliet Kinsman. Ule-leh le oooh leh ooh leh ooh, Gr-e-een School, the bamboo cathedral,” we’re all singing, following as words are projected on to a big screen on a roughly hewn bamboo stage. “Where the Earth is our te-e-eacher and her care is our song.” There is dancing. And hand-clapping. Even beatboxing. There’s an awful lot of smiling. This is my daughter’s school assembly in Bali. It’s the destination school for children of chief executives on a sabbatical and techie types who’ve sold their businesses and are looking for a new way to live. Read the whole article over at The Times.

John Hardy the Green Warriort

The Green Warrior in Nuvo

A profile of John Hardy in Nuvo Magazine. In Canada, he says, “They’re living a completely unsustainable lifestyle … at the expense of their grandchildren. We’re creating green leaders. Every school [now] is studying green.” The difference at his school in the Balinese jungle, he explains, is that “kids are living green.” Read the whole article and interview with John on the Nuvo website.  He covers topics like education, design, conservation, Green School, IBUKU and more.      

John Hardy Bali home New York Times

NY Times: Building a dream house in Bali

A walk down memory lane to a 2008  New York Times article about our home in Bali. When it came to their house, “We talked to the architect, Cheong Yew Kuan, about a fantasy,” Cynthia Hardy explained. “John’s brief was as few walls as possible, floor-to-ceiling windows upstairs and no door downstairs to maximize the outdoor living experience and the fabulous view. We wanted the house to be as open and as transparent as possible, so you could see the rice fields from wherever you stood inside.” The couple fell in love with the site when they first spotted it in 1992 on a cycling trip around Ubud. At the time, they were living in a small house with no electricity or hot water on the very edge of the Ayung River gorge, below the luxury Amandari Resort.  

John hardy in The Hindu

The Hindu: How green is your school?

A feature in The Hindu on Green School and John Hardy. With larger-than-life bamboo structures, the campus is supported by solar and hydro-power, a water recycling unit and a waste management centre. Leslie Beckman, a school administrator, who has three kids studying here, says, “The Kul Kul Connection programme, which is our integration with the Balinese community, allows the culture to happen naturally from within, rather than expats going to ‘view’ a local experience.” Bandana Tewari, a senior fashion journalist whose child studies here, says, “My daughter came to the Green School for a summer camp and that led the way for us to move here. Issues she was facing, such as low attention span, disinterest towards studying, have now vanished. She’s now a part of the Bio Bus project, where a bunch of children pick up over-used oil from restaurants across the city. The by-product, bio-diesel, is to run the school buses.” Read the whole article How green is your school? over at The Hindu’s website.

Bambu Indah in Architectural Digest

Bambu Indah in Architectural Digest

Come stay with us in the jungle! Huge honor to be featured in Architectural Digest. To read more of the article, head on over to the article.  Beautiful photos by Stephen Kent Johnson and text by Aaron Peasley. Of the new houses, John explains: “We looked at the view and it was sublime. But how do you build without blocking the view? So we left them open and built a netted sleeping arrangement so there would be the possibility of privacy and safety. I like to call one of them the Love Nest, and the other is called the Moon House because there’s a beautiful copper bathtub in the garden for moonlight bathing.”  

Ananda House by Architectural Digest

Architectural Digest featuring Ananda House at Green Village

Hot off the press! IBUKU’s latest creation for David Hornblow and family at Green Village is in the May edition of Architectural Digest. “It’s really important to me that we move beyond the bamboo-hut idea,” explains Elora, the creative director, emphasizing Ibuku’s integration of technical innovation with local craftsmanship. The combination has resulted in properties that are surprisingly ambitious in scale—one of these surreal tropical mansions boasts six floors and measures more than 8,000 square feet. “As we continue to push the limits, my role is to be the connector,” says Elora, who grew up in Bali and has never studied architecture. “With the client and Ibuku’s architects, model makers, and craftsmen, there’s an entire dialogue that unfolds when we create these houses.” Read more here.

Green School in Buzzfeed

Green School in Buzzfeed’s 7 awesome schools list

Green School made it to one of Buzzfeed’s famous lists- 7 awesome schools that make the whole day feel like recess.  The Green School in Bali is all about nature — it’s set in nature, built using natural materials, and its open plan encourages students to learn according to their natural impulses. Its two buildings, which are separated by a river, are even connected by a bamboo bridge! Run on solar power and renewable energy sources, the school has an organic garden that students cultivate, communal learning spaces, and even housing for staff. Plus, it’s really cool to look at. – Buzzfeed

the future of education in Bali

READ: Is the future of education growing in Bali?

Renee Martyna writes about the Green School in her article on Momentum: Teachers are given leeway to plan activities that foster real-life learning, but also to have fun and inspire. The environment is tolerant, and even encouraging, of differences, allowing students to do their their best without being pitted against one another. At fifth-, eighth-, and 12th-grade graduations, for example, students are asked to give a TED-style presentation on a cause or idea that they truly care about. The school community attends in great numbers to support these kids, with tears, and deep shifts in community consciousness, not uncommon. Read the full article here.