All posts filed under: John’s Green World

The Green Family in Bali and Press

Juliet Kinsman The Times Green School Bali

Is this the world’s coolest school?

Green School in The Times in a wonderful article by Green School parent Juliet Kinsman. Ule-leh le oooh leh ooh leh ooh, Gr-e-een School, the bamboo cathedral,” we’re all singing, following as words are projected on to a big screen on a roughly hewn bamboo stage. “Where the Earth is our te-e-eacher and her care is our song.” There is dancing. And hand-clapping. Even beatboxing. There’s an awful lot of smiling. This is my daughter’s school assembly in Bali. It’s the destination school for children of chief executives on a sabbatical and techie types who’ve sold their businesses and are looking for a new way to live. Read the whole article over at The Times.

Jaggery by Suzi Mifsud

Permaculture solutions for Bali’s coconut problems

A permaculture story by Orin Hardy.  There are lot of coconut trees in Bali and they’re a very important part of Bali’s culture and life. Coconuts are an incredible food source and they are disappearing because people don’t know how to climb trees any more, or how to manage the trees in increasingly populated areas where the coconuts actually become dangerous to people walking around underneath them. At Green School, The Kul Kul Farm has been working to find ways to ensure the long term productivity and ongoing management of the existing trees on the campus. Before the school existed the land was used as a coconut plantation, so now we look for ways to keep the trees productive and the school safe. It’s actually even more productive than it used to be as a coconut plantation because we are increasing the yields and we’re producing added value products like coconut sugar. The high quality sugar we produce is also supporting the development of a small industry in the area. The coconut climbing tool in …

John Hardy the Green Warriort

The Green Warrior in Nuvo

A profile of John Hardy in Nuvo Magazine. In Canada, he says, “They’re living a completely unsustainable lifestyle … at the expense of their grandchildren. We’re creating green leaders. Every school [now] is studying green.” The difference at his school in the Balinese jungle, he explains, is that “kids are living green.” Read the whole article and interview with John on the Nuvo website.  He covers topics like education, design, conservation, Green School, IBUKU and more.      

Sumba Hospirality Foundation permaculture gardens

The permaculture gardens of the Sumba Hospitality campus

Orin has been working on the gardens at the Sumba Hospitality Foundation as long as the IBUKU team were planning the beautiful buildings. They have really become something special. The Sumba Hotel School is setting a new tone for development on an island that is rapidly becoming another tourism destination in Indonesia. Built entirely of bamboo, this school offers high quality hospitality training to underprivileged young men and women on the island. The campus is off the grid and powered by solar power. Water is recycled and reused to water the gardens. The landscape is designed following permaculture ethics and principles. It includes a extensive food forests, an annual market garden, rotating animal system,  a collection of edible street trees, medicinal plants, and other perennials used for food and animal fodder. Students learn not only how to work in hospitality industry,  but are also taught how to care for the land and how to grow food and raise animals sustainably. It is a beautiful illustration of how to help traditional peoples enter the modern world …

John hardy in The Hindu

The Hindu: How green is your school?

A feature in The Hindu on Green School and John Hardy. With larger-than-life bamboo structures, the campus is supported by solar and hydro-power, a water recycling unit and a waste management centre. Leslie Beckman, a school administrator, who has three kids studying here, says, “The Kul Kul Connection programme, which is our integration with the Balinese community, allows the culture to happen naturally from within, rather than expats going to ‘view’ a local experience.” Bandana Tewari, a senior fashion journalist whose child studies here, says, “My daughter came to the Green School for a summer camp and that led the way for us to move here. Issues she was facing, such as low attention span, disinterest towards studying, have now vanished. She’s now a part of the Bio Bus project, where a bunch of children pick up over-used oil from restaurants across the city. The by-product, bio-diesel, is to run the school buses.” Read the whole article How green is your school? over at The Hindu’s website.

Join the Crowdrise campaign to get more students into Green School!

  Help make the stream of generosity become a river of love. There’s a lot of people pushing, so please join in giving us a push. John Hardy   Every single donation will be used to support local children and waste-related educational and learning activities. We happily share all our creative sustainable solutions with the 100,000+ people who connect with Green School each year. With your donation we will: Build a Community and Waste Recycling Education Centre (Innovation Hub) – over 700 children will be able to incubate, investigate, implement and share even better waste management solutions. $100,000 of campaign money will allow us to build this and fling the doors open to students and their ideas. Expand waste management solutions – let’s turn even more trash into desirable treasures by expanding the current reuse-recycle program. Turning plastic waste into usable products and art, up-cycling fashion design using repurposed/used clothing, maker-space equipment to repair household items, plus more, can all happen with $50,000 of campaign money to kit-out the innovation lab with the right equipment. …

Maxwell Hidajat at TEDxUbud

Green School Student Admitted to the Ivy League

We have our first Green School graduate heading to the Ivy League. Huge news and huge congratulations to Maxwell Hidajat for his achievement. Green School is more than competing at an international level academically in addition to everything else these amazing students are achieving holistically. A message from Maxwell Hidajat : “I will be joining Cornell’s community this August as a member of the Class of 2021 and as a student at Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences. Although I plan to study computer science there, I’m open to the possibility that I will find something else I’m passionate about and decide to pursue that instead. After all, Cornell is known for offering its students a rich and diverse array of academic pathways and extracurricular opportunities. Although I’m sad to be leaving Green School, I am extremely excited to make new friends, gain new experiences, and learn new things at Cornell and beyond. To my friends, my teachers, the kitchen staff, the gardeners, the security guards, the parents, and everyone else at Green School: thank …

Bambu Indah in Architectural Digest

Bambu Indah in Architectural Digest

Come stay with us in the jungle! Huge honor to be featured in Architectural Digest. To read more of the article, head on over to the article.  Beautiful photos by Stephen Kent Johnson and text by Aaron Peasley. Of the new houses, John explains: “We looked at the view and it was sublime. But how do you build without blocking the view? So we left them open and built a netted sleeping arrangement so there would be the possibility of privacy and safety. I like to call one of them the Love Nest, and the other is called the Moon House because there’s a beautiful copper bathtub in the garden for moonlight bathing.”  

Ananda House by Architectural Digest

Architectural Digest featuring Ananda House at Green Village

Hot off the press! IBUKU’s latest creation for David Hornblow and family at Green Village is in the May edition of Architectural Digest. “It’s really important to me that we move beyond the bamboo-hut idea,” explains Elora, the creative director, emphasizing Ibuku’s integration of technical innovation with local craftsmanship. The combination has resulted in properties that are surprisingly ambitious in scale—one of these surreal tropical mansions boasts six floors and measures more than 8,000 square feet. “As we continue to push the limits, my role is to be the connector,” says Elora, who grew up in Bali and has never studied architecture. “With the client and Ibuku’s architects, model makers, and craftsmen, there’s an entire dialogue that unfolds when we create these houses.” Read more here.

Isabel and Melati Wijsen in Forbes

Green School students on Forbes’ Most Inspiring Women list

Melati and Isabel of Bye Bye Plastic bags recently made it to Forbes’ Indonesia’s Most Inspiring Women. A huge achievement! The girls saw it firsthand in their favorite local beach, Seseh, which was, as Melati puts it, “swallowed up by garbage.” “When you’re at the beach sunbathing or going for a swim, you’re swimming with plastic, you’re sunbathing with plastic. There’s no escaping it,” says Melati. Those experiences led them, in April 2013, to start Bye Bye Plastic Bags, when they were just 10 and 12. The two girls attend the Bali Green School, which promotes environmentalism, so their campaign was in keeping with the school’s mission. “The question became ‘who’s going to do something about it?’ We thought ‘why don’t we do something about it? Why don’t we stand up for our island?’,’” Melati says. – See more at: http://forbesindonesia.com/berita-1303-isabel-and-melati-wijsen.html#sthash.MIq5t5XU.dpuf   Check out their whole story in their TED talk which has had over 1 million views to date: