Author: Green by John

Hardy Architectural Digest Photos by Tim Street Porter

Architectural Digest: The Hardy home in New York

Flashback to nearly ten years ago when Architectural Digest featured our New York home in the magazine. Photos taken by dear friend, Tim Street Porter. “I really hate fake everything,” says jewelry designer John Hardy, whose airy apartment on Manhattan’s Upper West Side is a kind of symphony of the real. Unexpected materials—from sconces of buffalo horn to Zulu hair hats—are used here to sumptuous effect. “We’re moving from luxury to authenticity as an idea,” Hardy says. “Authentic things seem to vibrate better.” Explore the whole gallery here or read the interview and story.

Cynthia Hardy

A profile of Cynthia Hardy

A wonderful interview and profile of Cynthia Hardy in MM. Lafleur. Cynthia talks about travels, her life as a mother, and her role as co-founder of Green School and more. ON FOUNDING A HOTEL… AND A SCHOOL: We started building our house in Bali in 1995, and it was finished in 1997. Then, in the early 2000s, a piece of land just south of ours came onto the market. We didn’t need more space, but we knew that if we didn’t buy it someone else was going to build a hotel there. So we bought it and sat on it for a few years. We knew this really industrious guy from Java, and we asked him to find us some furniture and old wooden houses—traditional ones built in primitive ways, from logs, without panels. We put them up on that land and had the Neiman Marcus buyers come out and stay there. Eventually, we decided to turn it into something that paid for itself, and now it’s a little hotel called Bambu Indah that’s essentially an …

Juliet Kinsman The Times Green School Bali

Is this the world’s coolest school?

Green School in The Times in a wonderful article by Green School parent Juliet Kinsman. Ule-leh le oooh leh ooh leh ooh, Gr-e-een School, the bamboo cathedral,” we’re all singing, following as words are projected on to a big screen on a roughly hewn bamboo stage. “Where the Earth is our te-e-eacher and her care is our song.” There is dancing. And hand-clapping. Even beatboxing. There’s an awful lot of smiling. This is my daughter’s school assembly in Bali. It’s the destination school for children of chief executives on a sabbatical and techie types who’ve sold their businesses and are looking for a new way to live. Read the whole article over at The Times.

Jaggery by Suzi Mifsud

Permaculture solutions for Bali’s coconut problems

A permaculture story by Orin Hardy.  There are lot of coconut trees in Bali and they’re a very important part of Bali’s culture and life. Coconuts are an incredible food source and they are disappearing because people don’t know how to climb trees any more, or how to manage the trees in increasingly populated areas where the coconuts actually become dangerous to people walking around underneath them. At Green School, The Kul Kul Farm has been working to find ways to ensure the long term productivity and ongoing management of the existing trees on the campus. Before the school existed the land was used as a coconut plantation, so now we look for ways to keep the trees productive and the school safe. It’s actually even more productive than it used to be as a coconut plantation because we are increasing the yields and we’re producing added value products like coconut sugar. The high quality sugar we produce is also supporting the development of a small industry in the area. The coconut climbing tool in …

READ: The Package Free Shop is here

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Refuse and Repair in one package-free store? It’s happening in Brooklyn, NYC, with the pop-up store run by Lauren Singer and Daniel Silverstein, two trash bloggers who have been on a zero-waste journey for years. ‘Think outside the box’ is the message. The Package Free Shop curates the products they sell to support a zero-waste lifestyle, ranging from reusable coffee cups to compostable toothbrushes. If this store opened a thousand branches across the globe, how much waste could we reduce? Read more about the Package Free project here. If you’re in NYC this summer, go and visit.    

John Hardy the Green Warriort

The Green Warrior in Nuvo

A profile of John Hardy in Nuvo Magazine. In Canada, he says, “They’re living a completely unsustainable lifestyle … at the expense of their grandchildren. We’re creating green leaders. Every school [now] is studying green.” The difference at his school in the Balinese jungle, he explains, is that “kids are living green.” Read the whole article and interview with John on the Nuvo website.  He covers topics like education, design, conservation, Green School, IBUKU and more.      

Installation by Joe Crossley at TEDxUbud

SEE: The Listening Bird at TEDxUbud

We collaborated with new media artist Joe Crossley to create an interactive light installation for the 2017 TEDxUbud.  Constructed from bamboo and cloth, the giant bird could ‘listen’ to the people around it and react, changing colors depending on the volume and tone. TEDx attendees sang to it, spoke different languages and even chanted some deep ‘Om’s to create different patterns. Photos by Suki Zoe and Viktor Wang for TEDxUbud.    

John Hardy Bali home New York Times

NY Times: Building a dream house in Bali

A walk down memory lane to a 2008  New York Times article about our home in Bali. When it came to their house, “We talked to the architect, Cheong Yew Kuan, about a fantasy,” Cynthia Hardy explained. “John’s brief was as few walls as possible, floor-to-ceiling windows upstairs and no door downstairs to maximize the outdoor living experience and the fabulous view. We wanted the house to be as open and as transparent as possible, so you could see the rice fields from wherever you stood inside.” The couple fell in love with the site when they first spotted it in 1992 on a cycling trip around Ubud. At the time, they were living in a small house with no electricity or hot water on the very edge of the Ayung River gorge, below the luxury Amandari Resort.  

Sumba Hospirality Foundation permaculture gardens

The permaculture gardens of the Sumba Hospitality campus

Orin has been working on the gardens at the Sumba Hospitality Foundation as long as the IBUKU team were planning the beautiful buildings. They have really become something special. The Sumba Hotel School is setting a new tone for development on an island that is rapidly becoming another tourism destination in Indonesia. Built entirely of bamboo, this school offers high quality hospitality training to underprivileged young men and women on the island. The campus is off the grid and powered by solar power. Water is recycled and reused to water the gardens. The landscape is designed following permaculture ethics and principles. It includes a extensive food forests, an annual market garden, rotating animal system,  a collection of edible street trees, medicinal plants, and other perennials used for food and animal fodder. Students learn not only how to work in hospitality industry,  but are also taught how to care for the land and how to grow food and raise animals sustainably. It is a beautiful illustration of how to help traditional peoples enter the modern world …

Sumba Hospitality Foundation Graduation (5 of 5)

The first Sumba Hospitality Foundation graduates!

“I was honored to witness the graduation of Sumba Hospitality Foundation‘s first class. An incredibly moving experience to watch 39 graduates and their families celebrate this milestone after seeing how hard Inge has fought to make this happen. We now have four graduates interning at Bambu Indah for six months. Come and meet them.” This weekend was a very special weekend for us at The Sumba Hospitality Foundation; we celebrated the end of a fantastic year with the graduation of our first class of students. It was a spectacular event and creativity flowed throughout the campus, from the beautiful decorations made by our students to the joyful dance and choir performances, not forgetting the heartfelt speeches. It was a highly emotional day for everybody as we watched the 39 young men and women receive their certificates and stand proudly in front of their friends and family. The celebration clearly showed the progress and confidence of our students, however we know their journey isn’t over yet. They are about to take their first steps into the world of work …